Archives: Sessions

Data Maturity: Using Data Tools to Improve Homeless Service System Outcomes

October 11, 2017 2017 Fall Conference

This session provides an abbreviated version of The Data Maturity Training initiative, which aims to improve communities’ readiness to maximize use of data for improved system performance. This session focuses on helping staff who are already skilled with data determine needs in their communities, as well as educate others about how to use data to make decisions and determine whether these decisions have a positive impact. The training methodology is built on critical adult learning principles. Facilitators provide foundational knowledge on each topic and participants engage in peer learning through small group discussions and problem-solving activities. Experiential learning exercises allow participants to model each stage of a Data into Action Cycle, and facilitators debrief with participants throughout the session to promote self-reflection and to enhance real-life application of learned strategies  for building a performance culture.

Presenter(s):

Sarah Kahn, Senior Analyst, The Cloudburst Group

Andrea Miller, Consultant, The Cloudburst Group

 

 

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Developing and Implementing a Homeless Project Scoring Tool to Aid Project Ranking and Better Understand System Performance

October 11, 2017 2017 Fall Conference

In 2017, Allegheny County (Pittsburgh), Pennsylvania’s CoC developed and implemented a homeless project performance scoring and ranking tool to more efficiently, objectively and transparently evaluate project performance and ultimately produce a project ranking list for the annual CoC competition. This session will share lessons learned, planned future improvements and how the scoring tool fits into the CoC’s broader homeless system analytical and performance measurement work.

Presenter(s):

Andy Halfhill, Manager of Homelessness and Housing Analytics, Allegheny County Department of Human Services

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How Are We Doing and Where Do We Go From Here? Interactive System Surveillance And Monitoring of San Diego’s Homeless System Of Care

October 11, 2017 2017 Fall Conference

San Diego County’s homeless system-of-care is quite large and complex, consisting of a least 60 agencies and 250 projects providing both temporary and permanent homeless-dedicated services to over 24,000 individuals per year throughout the county. Twelve project types range from day shelters and “services only” projects to permanent supportive housing. San Diego is also a community committed to Housing First, and thus seeking the correct solution for each client the first time they enroll in our system of care. In 2016, the San Diego Regional Task Force on the Homeless partnered with San Diego State University’s Institute for Public Health to design and implement a population-based surveillance and monitoring system for those served by San Diego’s homeless serving agencies. Such an approach is quite different than the traditional Point in Time Count or project level performance monitoring methods in that it seeks to provide a comprehensive look at the entire system of care including characteristics of those entering the system, how they are served and outcomes at the time of exit. It helps a community to determine if they have the correct combination of project types to serve the specific needs of their local community. Rather than measuring the effectiveness of individual projects and/or project types, a systems approach seeks to understand major barriers or inefficiencies in the system of care and how to correct them, usually through system-wide changes in policies and procedures. The result of this collaborative partnership was the development of an interactive web-based System Framework that visually describes the entire system of care at any point in time. Beyond detecting system barriers and/or inefficiencies, the framework also has the unique ability to visually monitor the progress over time of any policy or procedural change and its impact on the size, character and service outcomes for the population of homeless persons served. This presentation will include a demonstration of the interactive System Framework.

Presenter(s):

Sue Lindsay, Institute for Public Health, San Diego State University

Megan Hartrick, San Diego Regional Task Force on the Homeless

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The Rapid Deployment of Mobile Technology to Support a Coordinated Response to Hurricane Harvey

October 11, 2017 2017 Fall Conference Mobile Technology

In this session, we will share how the communities of Houston and Corpus Christi quickly designed,
developed and implemented a technical framework to support the Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. An overview will be provided on the challenges that were faced, followed by a discussion of how a services-oriented architecture (SOA) and integration with HMIS was leveraged to maximize the use of data to target the response. Attendees will be provided with a blueprint for how they might also respond to natural disasters, or other crises in their communities, using an integrated mix of open source and proprietary technologies.

Presenter(s):

Erol Fetahagic, HMIS Administrator, Houston Coalition for the Homeless

Ana Rausch, Senior Research Project Manager, Houston Coalition for the Homeless

Eddie Barber, Lead Developer, Simtech Solutions Inc.

Matt Simmonds, President, Simtech Solutions Inc.

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Using Data to Drive Partnerships and Enhanced Care Coordination

October 11, 2017 2017 Fall Conference Care Coordination

In a Medicaid non-expansion state, how can successful 1115 integrated care models keep going? The answer is using data to make your case! This session will highlight PSH and MCO partnerships; keeping in mind each other’s strengths and resources. We will focus on using data to drive leadership buy-in, common language and understanding each other’s goals while developing shared goals to maintain project longevity.

Presenter(s):

Jessica Preheim, CSH, Texas Senior Program Manager

Eva Thibaudeau, Director of Programs, Coalition for the Homeless

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Client-Centric Approaches to Informed Consent and Data Sharing

October 11, 2017 2017 Fall Conference Consents and Sharing

Behind each HMIS data point is a vulnerable person who needs assistance. In the world of big data we can forget about the importance of maintaining a client-centric approach  to assessing clients, collecting personal information and using it appropriately. This session will share approaches to developing plain language consent forms and data collection strategies that meet clients where they are, while utilizing a trauma-informed framework through increased readability and comprehension.

Presenter(s):

Andrea Miller, Independent Consultant, Waypoint Consulting

Ryan Burger, TA Consultant, ICF International

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Using Data to Drive Housing First

October 11, 2017 2017 Fall Conference Housing First

Homelessness is an urgent issue requiring immediate action. To improve, it is also important we make time for reflection. What works, what doesn’t and why? The San Diego Housing Commission (SDHC) believes in using data to drive better performance, and we encourage our partners to embrace a data-driven culture. This presentation will discuss the data strategies and practices used by SDHC to drive implementation of the Housing First model.

Presenter(s):

Melissa Peterman, Vice President of Homeless Housing Innovations, San Diego Housing Commission

Erica Snyder, Director of Homeless Housing Innovations, San Diego Housing Commission

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Pre-Conference Institute – HMIS Data Analytics

October 11, 2017 2017 Fall Conference

This Institute will help HMIS representatives understand the fundamentals of data analytics and how to apply that knowledge to key performance measures.

To successfully change the homeless service system and improve projects, the community needs reliable and comprehensive information. Critical to this is the ability of CoCs to examine HMIS data sets in order to find patterns and draw conclusions. Once analyzed, the results can be presented to target stakeholder groups, allowing for improved service and resource decision-making. For example, if you conduct outlier analysis on the length of stay, the results could help your CoC determine if the average length of stay is being skewed by a small number of individuals with much-longer-than- average lengths of stay. Understanding this allows stakeholders to account for the outliers when making strategic decisions to help shorten the overall length of stay in the community.

During this Institute, you will 1) learn fundamental analytic concepts; 2) understand the process for identifying the right data set to address specific analytic needs; and 3) identify trends, patterns and relationships in the selected data set. Attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop and a data set to analyze during the Institute. Information about the data set will be sent to attendees in advance of the session (a list of fields to include, a list of fields to exclude and data quality expectations).

Presenter(s):

Abby Miller, SNAPS Office, HUD

Fran Ledger, Canavan Associates

Sarah Kahn, The Cloudburst Group

Jamie Taylor, The Cloudburst Group

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NHSDC Fall 2017 Conference Evaluation

October 5, 2017

Things to Do in San Diego

October 3, 2017 2017 Fall Conference

Things To Do In San Diego

Explore All that Balboa Park Has to Offer – 1549 El Prado San Diego, CA 92101   Walk Around the Seaport Village – 849 W Harbor Dr San Diego, CA 92101   Make Your Way to Old Town – 2415 San Diego Ave   Horton Plaza – 324 Horton Plz San Diego, CA 92101

  • Restaurants
    • Cannonball – 3105 Ocean Front Walk San Diego, CA 92190 (Sushi/Asian Fusion)
    • JRDN Tower23 Hotel 723 Felspar St San Diego, CA 92109 (American)
    • Oceana – 3999 Mission Blvd San Diego, CA 92109 (Seafood)
    • Kono’s – 704 Garnet Ave San Diego, CA 92109 *Pro Tip: Great for breakfast burritos
    • LaHaina –  710 Oliver Ave San Diego, CA 92109 *Pro Tip: Great for sunset
    • Juniper and Ivy – 2228 Kettner Blvd San Diego, CA 92101 (American)
    • Kettner Exchange  –  2001 Kettner Blvd San Diego, CA 92101 (American)
    • Barbusa – 1917 India St San Diego, CA 92101 (Italian)
    • Coasterra – 880 Harbor Island Dr San Diego, CA 92101 (Mexican)

 

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We Have the Results from Our System Performance Measures, Now What?

April 26, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Detroit’s CoC has 96% HMIS adaption and complies with HUD requirements. However, HUD reports don’t meet all needs of stakeholders to drive policy, evaluate performance, identify gaps and tell local stories about homelessness. Results of SPM reports lack context. This session shows how project-level performance measures serve as an alternative to large data warehouses requiring client consent. We discuss Detroit’s process to validate SPM results, and share how administrators use project-level performance measures and Tableau reports to help Detroit understand project efficacy.

Natalie Matthews, Abt
Matt Simmonds, Simtech
Amanda Sternberg, Homeless Action Network of Detroit

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The Next Chapter Part I: PATH & HMIS Data Collection

April 26, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

HUD and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) released the 2nd version of the PATH Program HMIS Manual in December 2016. This roundtable session provides the latest guidance from HUD and SAMHSA on integrating PATH data collection into HMIS and provides space for peer-to-peer sharing and best practices on topics including challenges and solutions in the collection of street outreach data, strategies for ensuring successful PATH data entry, data quality, and data use in HMIS. This session is a companion to “The Next Chapter Part II: PATH Annual Report”.

Caroline Fernandez, Public Health Advisor SAMHSA, Homeless Programs Branch
Chris S. Pitcher, Senior Technical Specialist ICF
Ryan Burger, Technical Specialist, ICF
Mike Lindsay, Senior Technical Specialist, ICF
Natalie Matthews, Associate, Abt Associates Inc.

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Leveraging HMIS Data to Understand Program Impact and Improve Outcomes in Housing and Homelessness

April 26, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

A common homelessness prevention strategy is to provide temporary financial assistance to people facing eviction. A partnership in Chicago aimed to understand the impact of temporary financial assistance on preventing homelessness and to demonstrate the value and feasibility of leveraging administrative data to understand program impact and improve outcomes. LEO, a research center at Notre Dame, examined temporary financial assistance for callers to Chicago’s Homelessness Prevention Call Center from 2010-2012, linking caller data to Chicago’s HMIS. The discussion includes key program components enabling study of program impact; the process for accessing and linking administrative data; a summary of the evaluation findings; and implications for local and national stakeholders.

James X. Sullivan, PhD, Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO), University of Notre Dame, LEO Co-Founder and Professor of Economics
Padma Thangaraj, Director of Information Services, All Chicago

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Prioritization: Targeting Households and Coordinating Resources for the Most Successful Outcome

April 26, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This session will inform participants on how to target homeless households for appropriate housing interventions beyond the utilization of a vulnerability score and to analyze the community’s resources to meet actual need. The session will move beyond to core system policies and procedures, institutionalizing targeting practices, and analyzing community data to understand need for more effective resource allocation. Community presenters will provide perspective on current practices on the ground and making effective prioritization change within their systems.

Colleen Velez, Senior Program Manager, CSH
Stephanie Sideman, Senior Program Manager, CSH
Ana Rausch, Senior Research Project Manager, Coalition for the Homeless of Houston/Harris County

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A Community’s Perspective on Implementing and Operationalizing a Data Quality Assurance Program

April 26, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This session follows the Data Quality Assurance session at NHSDC last fall. CoCs often rely on a data quality policy or plan with periodic monitoring to ensure data quality. Having policies and monitoring data quality are key starting points, but are only part of what’s needed to ensure data is consistently reviewed and useable for system and project reporting. The Michigan Coalition Against Homelessness’ work on implementing a CoC-wide Data Quality Assurance Program provides a community example. Participants will work to complete a template/tool for their community’s plan.

Mike Lindsay, Senior Technical Specialist, ICF, International
Natalie Matthews, Associate, Abt Associates Inc.
Gerry Leslie, HMIS Project Director, Michigan Coalition Against Homelessness

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Special Session: Generating Top Tier Evidence on Program Impact with LEO at Notre Dame

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This session will support participants in understanding how to generate top tier evidence about program impact. Drawing from real world LEO case studies, participants will learn about top tier research designs, how they differ from other evaluations, and why they are important for reducing poverty and improving lives. The session will walk through the evaluation process, including setting up a program to allow for top tier evaluation, common barriers and solutions, launching and monitoring the evaluation, data analysis, and using evidence to drive decision-making and results.
James X. Sullivan, PhD, Co-Founder and Professor of Economics, Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO), University of Notre Dame
Wendy P. Barreno, Associate Director, Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO), University of Notre Dame

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The Power of Integrated Data and Coordinated Access: Boston’s Open Source Solution

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Last year the City of Boston took a deep breath and embarked on developing a novel, open source solution for HMIS data warehousing and Coordinated Access to housing resources – an initiative that used agile development to realize the benefits of engineering a new system from the ground up. Today we share the successes, challenges, and future of the resulting project, both from a technology perspective, and the contributions it has made to Boston’s mission to end homelessness.

Laila Bernstein, Advisor to the Mayor of Boston, Initiative to End Chronic Homelessness, City of Boston
Jennifer Flynn, HMIS Administrator, City of Boston,
Ian Kozak, Director of Strategic Development, Green River

 

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Maintaining a Dynamic Housing Priority List within your Coordinated Access/Assessment System

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

The Dallas CoC developed policies and procedures for homelessness prioritization through documentation and development of a housing priority list (HPL). CoCs are challenged to develop a HPL that reflects real-time housing demand and is not ever-growing. The Coordinated Assessment System developed protocols for a dynamic HPL that holds agencies accountable to business rules. Attendees will learn about Documentation of Priority Status that classifies prioritization per HUD notices, how MDHA manages the HPL, and how performance is monitored using a community dashboard.

Cindy Crain, Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance

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The Role of Data in Ending Homelessness among Youth

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

As communities progress on ending youth homelessness, data challenges have surfaced. This session provides opportunity for multiple café-style facilitated conversations among participants to discuss key roles for data in ending youth homelessness, integrating data into the conversation, and discussing strategies to ensure youth are active participants. Key areas of conversation include: protecting data privacy, building relationships with youth, asking sensitive questions, data sharing and receiving consent, cross-system coordination, coordinated entry, and targeting.

Amy Louttit, Public Policy Associate, National Network for Youth
Susan Starrett, Senior Program Manager, CSH

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Utilizing Data to Optimize Active List and Case Conferencing Processes

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Security and privacy of client data is paramount and communities struggle to balance it with the need to rapidly house people. Communities have tested processes to maximize case conferencing meetings, finding that use of data, e.g. the active list, is the best way to ensure fair treatment based on local prioritization policies and ongoing review and engagement of people inactive, missing, and/or not interested in housing. This session highlights privacy and security practices as data populates active lists and subsequently is shared with stakeholders during case conferencing.

Sue Augustus, Senior Program Manager, CSH
Stephanie Sideman, Senior Program Manager, CSH
Alex Hartvigsen, HMIS System Administrator, State of Utah, Dept. of Workforce Services

 

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Using What You Have and Who You’ve Got

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Does your CoC struggle translating performance metrics from the CoC NOFA into daily work? Are providers at varying levels of tech-savviness? We found the best Performance Reports are ones that providers understand with outcomes they care about and don’t need fancy coding or software. This session shows a community-wide process to create and agency-specific process to implement quarterly performance reports. We explain how translating obtuse HUD reports (system performance measures), and connecting them to everyday data entry increased our CoC’s data literacy and data quality.

Alicia Clark, Program Assistant, Homeless Alliance of Western New York

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Demystifying Privacy Law: Practical Advice for HMIS and Human Services

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

People experiencing homelessness are vulnerable, and maintaining privacy is vital. But serving clients requires data sharing across providers and between systems governed by an alphabet soup of privacy laws: HIPAA, 42 C.F.R. Part 2, VAWA, FERPA, and PPRA etc. HMIS and Human Services data professionals must navigate privacy laws to work with CoC and CES leadership, providers, and other systems. This session guides you through the regulatory framework governing HMIS and human services client data. Attendees will walk away prepared to answer frequent questions from communities.

Matt Olsson, Staff Attorney, HomeBase
Mary McGrail, Policy Analyst, HomeBase

 

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Tools and Techniques to Produce Reliable Statewide Point in Time Counts

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Coordinating accurate PIT count is a challenge even for small regions. Both Connecticut and San Antonio used paper-based counts but moved to mobile tech and dashboards. San Antonio conducted a blitz count with full canvassing while Connecticut used geographic-sampling. We will show how geospatial survey data collected with mobile devices along with GIS and reporting tools is superior to paper. We will cover the pre-count planning process, review statistical analysis required for sampling, logic used for CoC and statewide estimates, post count clean-up, and lessons learned.

Jackie Janosko, CT Coalition to End Homelessness
Eddie Barber, Simtech Solutions
Luke Leppla, Project Manager, South Alamo Regional Alliance for the Homeless (San Antonio)
Dan Treglia, PhD

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The Next Chapter Part II: PATH Annual Report

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

HUD and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) released an updated PATH Annual Report and accompanying PATH Annual Report Technical Specifications in 2016. This roundtable session provides the latest guidance from HUD and SAMHSA on the PATH Annual Report and builds on “The Next Chapter Part I: PATH & HMIS Data Collection” session. Peer-to-peer sharing and best practices on topics including challenges and solutions in collection of street outreach data, strategies for ensuring successful PATH data entry, data quality, and reporting in HMIS will be included.

Caroline Fernandez, Public Health Advisor SAMHSA, Homeless Programs Branch
Chris S. Pitcher, Senior Technical Specialist ICF
Ryan Burger, Technical Specialist, ICF
Mike Lindsay, Senior Technical Specialist, ICF
Natalie Matthews, Associate, Abt Associates Inc.

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Introducing the HMIS Data Quality Framework (Repeat)

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This is a repeat session from the Data Quality Institute. The newly released HMIS Data Quality Framework can be used to dig deep into HMIS data and make improvements to the data quality. This session provides a comprehensive overview of the purpose of each of the seven newly developed Data Quality Report tables, what the data reported in the tables means, and how users can use the information to improve their data quality.

Meradith Alspaugh, HMIS Data Lab Director
David Durkalski, Senior Programmer, The Partnership Center

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Developing and Deploying an Interactive Community Dashboard: An Empirical Window into Homelessness

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This presentation describes a university community engagement project in which demographic and service delivery data are captured, analyzed, and disseminated on an interactive dashboard. In March 2016 Knoxville’s Office on Homelessness and KnoxHMIS launched a website with info on homelessness and provider performance. Administered by University of Tennessee College of Social Work, KnoxHMIS is the nation’s only university-run HMIS. We will discuss JavaScript’s use to dynamically update data and front-end presentation styling through HTML and CSS, and measures used.

David A. Patterson, PhD, University of Tennessee College of Social Work
Lisa Higginbotham, M.S.S.W. is the Program Manager and Data Analyst for KnoxHMIS
Gary Moats, B.S, University of Tennessee College of Social Work’s Office of Research and Public Service.

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Nonprofits Collaborating with HMIS to Manage Coordinated Access and Housing Programs

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Learn how Utah partners with HMIS to develop and maintain new programs in HMIS. Examples include: the Community Triage Group (Coordinated Access), SSVF housing placement team, and the Housing Not Jail (HNJ) Pay for Success project targeting the “persistently homeless.” The programming includes intense scrutiny, continual review and revision, regular outcome and performance measurement, and collaboration with evaluators. Discussion will include lessons learned and what to take into consideration when determining the kind of projects to take on in other communities.

Dee Norton, Utah Road Home
Tamera Kohler, Assistance Division Director of the Housing and Community Development at the State of Utah

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HOPWA & HMIS – A Dialogue about Partnership

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This panel features a dialogue between Office of HIV/AIDS Housing (OHH) staff, HOPWA grantees currently or considering using HMIS, and TA providers about possibilities and challenges utilizing HMIS for HOPWA data collection and reporting. Current guidance related to project set-up and system utilization are addressed. Topics include: project set-up, including SSO projects; pulling HOPWA data; “required” vs. “encouraged” language; client confidentiality; crosswalk between HMIS and HOPWA CAPER/APR; and working with multiple CoCs within the HOPWA EMSA.

Claire Donze, Office of HIV/AIDS & Housing
Allyson Thiessen, CARES NY
Rusty Bennett, Collaborative Solutions, Inc.
Becky Blalock, Collaborative Solutions, Inc.

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Introducing a community wide solution – Social Services Information Exchange

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This session will share experiences from a community that has implemented a community wide Social Services Information Exchange (SSIE). There is growing need for SSIEs but implementing them can be outside the community comfort zone. Benefits for SSIEs include aggregate reporting and single stop centralized intakes to services across all providers in the network. Data can be managed efficiently while helping clients receive needed services. The questions of how to deploy, how to manage and the best possible outcomes for this type of deployment will be reviewed.

Sam Coy, J.D., MBA, PhD(C)

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Connecting the Dots: Technology & Coordinated Access to Enhance your PIT

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Most communities use paper survey tools when conducting the annual Point-In-Time count of homeless persons. This methodology is often labor intensive and creates a time-lag between PIT count completion and presentation of the data summary to the community. In 2016, the Houston CoC converted to a paperless PIT and used aspects of their Coordinated Access System to enhance it. This session will cover how this transition happened, the success of the Coordinated Access System, the technology used, a summary of the process, and a discussion on the successes and lessons learned.

Ana Rausch, Houston Coalition for the Homeless

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Distributive Data Collection: Finding Youth in Other People’s Living Rooms

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

The Homeless Alliance of Western New York needed to know how many young people were homeless or couch surfing. This presentation describes the strategies, relationships and ownership of this project, protection of young people’s identities while de-duplicating data across 3 sources, and utilization of cheap and easily-available tools to conduct the 2016 Youth BeCountedWNY! PIT count. We aim to share what we learned to help other communities help their young people facing housing instability.

Christine Slocum, Research Analyst, Homeless Alliance of Western New York

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Creating a Culture of Shared Knowledge – Democratizing Your Organization’s Data via Dynamic Reporting

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This session will demonstrate how analysts went from the on-going cycle of recreating legacy reports and fielding help desk tickets for ad hoc data requests to utilizing open-source data science tools. This session features demos of web-based reports as case studies for how dynamic reporting tool can empower data users, strengthen your organization’s culture of openness, and ultimately serve to clearly and effectively visualize and quantify your organization’s impact. We will show how to build a custom interactive report on the spot.

Matt Stevens, Director of Data Science
Geoffrey Kip, Data Analyst

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Creating a data driven culture inside the CoCs through advanced data visualization

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This presentation discusses how the Washington Families Fund Systems Initiative team led by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Building Changes and King, Pierce and Snohomish Counties used Tableau software to create visualizations that went beyond illustrating quantitative findings but uncovered new knowledge about homeless individuals’ experience. This work culminates in great wins for organizations. Key visualizations created by the evaluators and analysts from King County can be viewed in a publicly available website http://allhomekc.org/the-problem/#the-numbers.
John Barr, Senior Consultant, Viztric
Stephanie Roe, Project Manager, King County, Performance Measurement & Evaluation Unit

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Data Migration (From Legacy to Real Time)

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

July 2016: the Georgia HMIS Steering Committee was told their HMIS software would not sustain the requirements needed for the state. We had only 3 months because the legacy HMIS software would not be available after the 1st of the year. Each component of the migration and transition was expedited with no room for error. A project management work plan included procurement, training, planning for non-HMIS data, data warehousing, and legacy data migration. This session discusses how GA HMIS procurement, migration and transition happened in 3 months and we lived to tell about it.

Dave Totten, Business Operations Coordinator, Georgia Department of Community Affairs
Jeanette Pollock, Special Projects Manager, Georgia Department of Community Affairs

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Increasing HMIS Participation

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This interactive session provides a place for participants to discuss HMIS participation and learn best practices. Facilitated by the Cloudburst Group, the session focuses on increasing HMIS participation, particularly by providers not federally funded or without a requirement to participate in HMIS. There will be a focus on opportunities and barriers, including impact of federal data collection rules. The session explores merits of various data entry and participation methods (direct data entry, periodic uploads, etc.) used when bringing new programs or providers onto HMIS.

Abbilyn Miller, Ph.D., Data Analyst and SNAPs Specialist, HUD
Joel Remigio, Sr. Analyst, Housing and Community Development, The Cloudburst Group

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Youth Privacy Summit

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Integration and Warehousing Data Standards and Regulations

NHSDC and the National Network for Youth (NN4Y) are convening The Youth Privacy Summit, a gathering of service providers, educators, justice administrators, and federal/state/local policy makers to formally document barriers to collecting accurate and timely information from young people experiencing homelessness. As recent successes in ending veterans’ homelessness have shown, measuring the problem is a prerequisite to solving it.

The complex intersection of privacy protections, emergency needs, and community goals creates a challenging environment for service providers to collect eligibility information, service needs, and connect unaccompanied minors to life-saving services. Often outreach workers and social workers are confronted with a choice between serving a youth or documenting their interaction.

NHSDC has a history of creating forums for policy makers, service providers, and data experts to navigate complex challenges. Solving the critical problems that put young people on the street without access to resources requires contributions from a variety of experts. NHSDC is partnering with NN4Y to bring together the best group of people to define the problem.

NN4Y mobilizes the collective power and expertise of our national community to influence public policy and strengthen effective responses to youth homelessness. NN4Y has been a critical partner assisting communities resolve challenges consolidating HMIS and RHYMIS. This unique forum will gather an inventory of barriers to collecting information both for use in understanding youth homelessness, and more importantly, as an essential activity to connecting individual youth with service providers.

This discussion is a necessary step to overcome the barriers that contribute to youth homelessness in the United States. The goal of the Summit is to create a clear articulation of the problem to allow for continued progress measuring and ending youth homelessness. NHSDC and NN4Y are committed to this goal and believe this Summit will be the next step in that process.

Making Data Available on a Website Near You – Now showing – The HMIS Archive

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

HUD’s national HMIS Data Lab created a methodology to archive, attend, and display de-identified client-level HMIS data to allow users to query and use data in new ways. The presentation will explain how data is cleaned, stripped from all identifiers, attended in a SQL table, and made visible with an interactive (.net) web front. Participants will receive the documentation and code necessary to reproduce this with your own HMIS data. Presenter(s): David Durkalski and Meradith Alspaugh, The Partnership Center.

HOPWA & HMIS: Enhancing Coordination and Health Outcomes

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Reporting and Data Analysis

This session will be an opportunity for HOPWA providers serving homeless PLWHA and required to use Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) to discuss successes and challenges around how we, as a community, can collect accurate and complete data while respecting client confidentiality. Additional topics: implementing /reporting for HOPWA programs through HMIS and the connection between HMIS, IDIS, Care Act Programs and other federal programs. Presenter(s): Rusty Bennett and Becky Blalock, Collaborative Solutions, Inc.

Accelerating Outcome Improvement Through Care Coordination Technology

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Collaborations

Integrated care coordination technology equips CBOs, government, schools, and employers to work together, keeping clients from falling through the cracks. Unite US and 2-1-1 San Diego will report on new collaborative technology, and review the successes/failures of networks currently deploying these tools. Presenters will discuss evidence-based impact, lessons learned, and paths forward. Audience members will learn about this innovative collective-impact approach, including use of community-wide data to perfect service delivery. Presenter(s): Taylor Justice (@tayjustice), Unite US; Bill York (@billyorksd), 2-1-1 San Diego.

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Critical Conversation: The Intersection of DV and Homelessness in a Data Driven World

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Collection

Through a unique federal partnership between the DOJ, HUD and HHS, the national Domestic Violence & Housing Technical Assistance Consortium was created to improve policies, identify promising practices and strengthen collaborations to improve housing options for survivors of DV. This interactive session will examine the critical intersection of DV and homelessness and explore the challenges and emerging practices of integrating DV into coordinated entry and effective data collection. Presenter(s): Rusty Bennett and Christie Bevis, Collaborative Solutions, Inc.; Larisa Kofman, National Alliance for Safe Housing; Monica McLaughlin, National Network to End Domestic Violence; Anne Menard, National Resource Center for Domestic Violence.

You Can Do It! Developing a Statewide Annual Report on Homelessness

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

An HMIS system is a powerful tool, providing a wealth of data. However, that data is only valuable if it is used! In this session, we will cover the fundamentals of creating a CoC or statewide annual report. We will cover important decisions surrounding analytic measurement, approaches to validating data, and developing narrative to explain trends. Presenter(s): Gerry Leslie and Barb Ritter, The Michigan Coalition Against Homelessness.

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Moving the System with Data

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

Data is a key tool to effective decision making and future planning for Continua of Care as funding becomes more and more competitive. While the value of data is becoming more and more recognized for community planning and evaluation, often communities struggle with how to make data accessible and usable across multiple data sources, including HMIS, Point in Time Count data (both from HMIS and Counting Us, a Point in Time Count Mobile App developed by Simtech Solutions, Inc.), the Housing Inventory, the AHAR, System Performance Measures, and others. Since the early 2000’s, The Planning Council has served as the backbone support agency for two Continua of Care (CoC) in the southeastern Virginia region. In that time, their CoC team has worked collaboratively with community partners to develop a number of reports and evaluation tools based on the data sources mentioned above, in an effort to move beyond fulfilling federal and state funding requirements for many of the reports, to actually using the data to inform strategies and funding priorities to effectively end. Presenter(s): Yilla Smith and Becky O’Meara, The Planning Council.

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Using Web-based Solutions to End Veteran Homelessness in Los Angeles

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

No more spreadsheets! LA is using web-based solutions to build our by-name list and track housing veterans. The presentation is targeted for intermediate and advanced users and admins of by-name lists, HMIS and other data systems. Covering the development process and challenges of creating the list, including un-duplicating records, privacy concerns, and data integration of multiple sources, and allowing for community feedback and adapting policies and procedures to the web. Presenter(s): Pada Lee, Joanna Bomba and Andrew Angeles, Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority.

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The Larkin Street Outcomes Lifecycle: From Creation to Cultural Shift

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

In 2013 Larkin Street outlined an outcomes framework with short, intermediate, and long-term agency wide outcome goals in four life domains: housing, education, employment, and wellness. Since then, Larkin Street has utilized a data management system to record, measure, report on, and learn from outcome findings. This workshop will cover the outcomes lifecycle and will include a discussion on successes, limitations, developing staff buy-in, and using data to inform the work. Presenter(s): Meghan Bernstein and Erica Werpetinski, Larkin Street Youth Services.

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Utilizing Data to Drive Care Coordination of Frequent Users of Medical Transports and Emergency Departments

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

Mecklenburg EMS Agency (Medic) and Mecklenburg County Community Support Services shares its developed framework in identifying individuals with high frequency use of emergency transport, often times, for non-emergency medical treatment. Attendees will learn how to share and utilize data of frequent and super users of EMS, determine stakeholders to address needs of users, and understand the importance of continued engagement and assessment. Presenter(s): Allison In nger, Mecklenburg EMS Agency; Karen Pelletier (@KPMSW1), Mecklenburg County Community Support Services.

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Using Technology to Create an Effective By-Name List: A How To and Action Planning Workshop

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Integration and Warehousing

During this workshop, participants will learn concrete recommendations and best practices that can be used to create and leverage a real-time, up-to-date, community wide By-Name List of all people experiencing homelessness. Participants will evaluate their current technology and data systems against these recommendations to identify gaps and understand various options for solutions. Participants will strategize and action plan next steps necessary to execute any desired recommendation and best practices. Presenter(s): Karina Mueller and Jessica Marcus, Community Solutions; Tauri Royce, Bitfocus, Inc.

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Designing and Implementing a Data Quality Assurance Program for your CoC’s HMIS

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Integration and Warehousing

Communities often rely on a data quality policy or plan with only periodic monitoring to ensure data quality in their community. During this session, participants will learn how to develop a comprehensive data quality program and will be given the tools necessary to understand and utilize the four key components of a sound data quality program: CoC HMIS Data Quality Plan; enforceable agreements; monitoring and reporting; and compliance processes. Presenter(s): Natalie Matthews, Abt Associates; Mike Lindsay, ICF.

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Crossing Data to Connect Systems: Using Data to Improve Services for Vulnerable People

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

Learn about the Houston/Harris County Continuum of Care and two Managed Care Organizations’ (United Healthcare and Molina) experience of how the housing and health services systems engaged in data exchange to identify shared frequent users and best target resources. The session will explore each party’s unique interest in participation, initial challenges, lessons learned, successes and how this exchange began to build a bridge of communication for the two systems. Presenter(s): Kelly Opot (@ksotx), CSH (@cshinfo); Kim Nettleton, United Healthcare (@UnitedHealthGrp); Eva Thibaudeau (@texaseva13), Coalition for the Homeless; Susan Tucker, Molina Healthcare, Inc. (@molinahealth).

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Los Angeles County Family System Dashboard (Homeless Family Solutions System)

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

The Homeless Family Solutions System is the first homeless system in the country created specifically to serve homeless families. This presentation will show how the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority is using software to share, with the public, current data for their Homeless Family Solutions System and how it is using real time data to inform program implementation and process changes. Presenter(s): Martha Macias, LA Family Housing Corporation; Vanessa Romero and Andrew Angeles, Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority.

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Challenges and Solutions for Collecting Comprehensive Data on Homelessness in Rural Communities

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Collection

As HUD continues to emphasize the importance of HMIS data coverage and comprehensive PIT counts for Continua of Care (CoC) to inform strategic resource allocation and to generate System Performance Measures, it becomes critical for CoCs covering rural communities and large geographies to identify innovative strategies for increasing data coverage and comprehensiveness. The presentation will first identify and discuss the various challenges faced by CoCs covering rural areas in terms of collecting complete and accurate data on homelessness. Topics include expanding HMIS coverage, conducting accurate and comprehensive PIT counts, utilizing alternative data collection approaches, and developing community-wide Active or Master Lists. The audience will hear about the various strategies that have been successful to increase data quality and coverage and deliver services across a large geographic region. The session will also allow adequate time for participants to ask questions of the presenters and to share their own experiences regarding challenges and solutions to collecting and using data across rural and/or large geographic areas. The presentation is intended to help these CoC’s identify potential strategies that they can implement as well as to connect staff from various rural CoCs in order to facilitate peer to peer sharing after NHSDC ends. Presenter(s): Fran Ledger, Canavan Associates; Ryan Burger and Chris Pitcher (@pitcherific), ICF.