Spring 2019 Conference April 15 - 17, 2019 in Nashville, TN

Archives: Sessions

The Power of Integrated Data and Coordinated Access: Boston’s Open Source Solution

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Last year the City of Boston took a deep breath and embarked on developing a novel, open source solution for HMIS data warehousing and Coordinated Access to housing resources – an initiative that used agile development to realize the benefits of engineering a new system from the ground up. Today we share the successes, challenges, and future of the resulting project, both from a technology perspective, and the contributions it has made to Boston’s mission to end homelessness.

Laila Bernstein, Advisor to the Mayor of Boston, Initiative to End Chronic Homelessness, City of Boston
Jennifer Flynn, HMIS Administrator, City of Boston,
Ian Kozak, Director of Strategic Development, Green River

 

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Maintaining a Dynamic Housing Priority List within your Coordinated Access/Assessment System

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

The Dallas CoC developed policies and procedures for homelessness prioritization through documentation and development of a housing priority list (HPL). CoCs are challenged to develop a HPL that reflects real-time housing demand and is not ever-growing. The Coordinated Assessment System developed protocols for a dynamic HPL that holds agencies accountable to business rules. Attendees will learn about Documentation of Priority Status that classifies prioritization per HUD notices, how MDHA manages the HPL, and how performance is monitored using a community dashboard.

Cindy Crain, Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance

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The Role of Data in Ending Homelessness among Youth

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

As communities progress on ending youth homelessness, data challenges have surfaced. This session provides opportunity for multiple café-style facilitated conversations among participants to discuss key roles for data in ending youth homelessness, integrating data into the conversation, and discussing strategies to ensure youth are active participants. Key areas of conversation include: protecting data privacy, building relationships with youth, asking sensitive questions, data sharing and receiving consent, cross-system coordination, coordinated entry, and targeting.

Amy Louttit, Public Policy Associate, National Network for Youth
Susan Starrett, Senior Program Manager, CSH

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Utilizing Data to Optimize Active List and Case Conferencing Processes

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Security and privacy of client data is paramount and communities struggle to balance it with the need to rapidly house people. Communities have tested processes to maximize case conferencing meetings, finding that use of data, e.g. the active list, is the best way to ensure fair treatment based on local prioritization policies and ongoing review and engagement of people inactive, missing, and/or not interested in housing. This session highlights privacy and security practices as data populates active lists and subsequently is shared with stakeholders during case conferencing.

Sue Augustus, Senior Program Manager, CSH
Stephanie Sideman, Senior Program Manager, CSH
Alex Hartvigsen, HMIS System Administrator, State of Utah, Dept. of Workforce Services

 

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Using What You Have and Who You’ve Got

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Does your CoC struggle translating performance metrics from the CoC NOFA into daily work? Are providers at varying levels of tech-savviness? We found the best Performance Reports are ones that providers understand with outcomes they care about and don’t need fancy coding or software. This session shows a community-wide process to create and agency-specific process to implement quarterly performance reports. We explain how translating obtuse HUD reports (system performance measures), and connecting them to everyday data entry increased our CoC’s data literacy and data quality.

Alicia Clark, Program Assistant, Homeless Alliance of Western New York

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Demystifying Privacy Law: Practical Advice for HMIS and Human Services

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

People experiencing homelessness are vulnerable, and maintaining privacy is vital. But serving clients requires data sharing across providers and between systems governed by an alphabet soup of privacy laws: HIPAA, 42 C.F.R. Part 2, VAWA, FERPA, and PPRA etc. HMIS and Human Services data professionals must navigate privacy laws to work with CoC and CES leadership, providers, and other systems. This session guides you through the regulatory framework governing HMIS and human services client data. Attendees will walk away prepared to answer frequent questions from communities.

Matt Olsson, Staff Attorney, HomeBase
Mary McGrail, Policy Analyst, HomeBase

 

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Tools and Techniques to Produce Reliable Statewide Point in Time Counts

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Coordinating accurate PIT count is a challenge even for small regions. Both Connecticut and San Antonio used paper-based counts but moved to mobile tech and dashboards. San Antonio conducted a blitz count with full canvassing while Connecticut used geographic-sampling. We will show how geospatial survey data collected with mobile devices along with GIS and reporting tools is superior to paper. We will cover the pre-count planning process, review statistical analysis required for sampling, logic used for CoC and statewide estimates, post count clean-up, and lessons learned.

Jackie Janosko, CT Coalition to End Homelessness
Eddie Barber, Simtech Solutions
Luke Leppla, Project Manager, South Alamo Regional Alliance for the Homeless (San Antonio)
Dan Treglia, PhD

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The Next Chapter Part II: PATH Annual Report

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

HUD and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) released an updated PATH Annual Report and accompanying PATH Annual Report Technical Specifications in 2016. This roundtable session provides the latest guidance from HUD and SAMHSA on the PATH Annual Report and builds on “The Next Chapter Part I: PATH & HMIS Data Collection” session. Peer-to-peer sharing and best practices on topics including challenges and solutions in collection of street outreach data, strategies for ensuring successful PATH data entry, data quality, and reporting in HMIS will be included.

Caroline Fernandez, Public Health Advisor SAMHSA, Homeless Programs Branch
Chris S. Pitcher, Senior Technical Specialist ICF
Ryan Burger, Technical Specialist, ICF
Mike Lindsay, Senior Technical Specialist, ICF
Natalie Matthews, Associate, Abt Associates Inc.

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Introducing the HMIS Data Quality Framework (Repeat)

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This is a repeat session from the Data Quality Institute. The newly released HMIS Data Quality Framework can be used to dig deep into HMIS data and make improvements to the data quality. This session provides a comprehensive overview of the purpose of each of the seven newly developed Data Quality Report tables, what the data reported in the tables means, and how users can use the information to improve their data quality.

Meradith Alspaugh, HMIS Data Lab Director
David Durkalski, Senior Programmer, The Partnership Center

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Developing and Deploying an Interactive Community Dashboard: An Empirical Window into Homelessness

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This presentation describes a university community engagement project in which demographic and service delivery data are captured, analyzed, and disseminated on an interactive dashboard. In March 2016 Knoxville’s Office on Homelessness and KnoxHMIS launched a website with info on homelessness and provider performance. Administered by University of Tennessee College of Social Work, KnoxHMIS is the nation’s only university-run HMIS. We will discuss JavaScript’s use to dynamically update data and front-end presentation styling through HTML and CSS, and measures used.

David A. Patterson, PhD, University of Tennessee College of Social Work
Lisa Higginbotham, M.S.S.W. is the Program Manager and Data Analyst for KnoxHMIS
Gary Moats, B.S, University of Tennessee College of Social Work’s Office of Research and Public Service.

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Nonprofits Collaborating with HMIS to Manage Coordinated Access and Housing Programs

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Learn how Utah partners with HMIS to develop and maintain new programs in HMIS. Examples include: the Community Triage Group (Coordinated Access), SSVF housing placement team, and the Housing Not Jail (HNJ) Pay for Success project targeting the “persistently homeless.” The programming includes intense scrutiny, continual review and revision, regular outcome and performance measurement, and collaboration with evaluators. Discussion will include lessons learned and what to take into consideration when determining the kind of projects to take on in other communities.

Dee Norton, Utah Road Home
Tamera Kohler, Assistance Division Director of the Housing and Community Development at the State of Utah

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HOPWA & HMIS – A Dialogue about Partnership

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This panel features a dialogue between Office of HIV/AIDS Housing (OHH) staff, HOPWA grantees currently or considering using HMIS, and TA providers about possibilities and challenges utilizing HMIS for HOPWA data collection and reporting. Current guidance related to project set-up and system utilization are addressed. Topics include: project set-up, including SSO projects; pulling HOPWA data; “required” vs. “encouraged” language; client confidentiality; crosswalk between HMIS and HOPWA CAPER/APR; and working with multiple CoCs within the HOPWA EMSA.

Claire Donze, Office of HIV/AIDS & Housing
Allyson Thiessen, CARES NY
Rusty Bennett, Collaborative Solutions, Inc.
Becky Blalock, Collaborative Solutions, Inc.

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Introducing a community wide solution – Social Services Information Exchange

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This session will share experiences from a community that has implemented a community wide Social Services Information Exchange (SSIE). There is growing need for SSIEs but implementing them can be outside the community comfort zone. Benefits for SSIEs include aggregate reporting and single stop centralized intakes to services across all providers in the network. Data can be managed efficiently while helping clients receive needed services. The questions of how to deploy, how to manage and the best possible outcomes for this type of deployment will be reviewed.

Sam Coy, J.D., MBA, PhD(C)

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Connecting the Dots: Technology & Coordinated Access to Enhance your PIT

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

Most communities use paper survey tools when conducting the annual Point-In-Time count of homeless persons. This methodology is often labor intensive and creates a time-lag between PIT count completion and presentation of the data summary to the community. In 2016, the Houston CoC converted to a paperless PIT and used aspects of their Coordinated Access System to enhance it. This session will cover how this transition happened, the success of the Coordinated Access System, the technology used, a summary of the process, and a discussion on the successes and lessons learned.

Ana Rausch, Houston Coalition for the Homeless

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Distributive Data Collection: Finding Youth in Other People’s Living Rooms

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

The Homeless Alliance of Western New York needed to know how many young people were homeless or couch surfing. This presentation describes the strategies, relationships and ownership of this project, protection of young people’s identities while de-duplicating data across 3 sources, and utilization of cheap and easily-available tools to conduct the 2016 Youth BeCountedWNY! PIT count. We aim to share what we learned to help other communities help their young people facing housing instability.

Christine Slocum, Research Analyst, Homeless Alliance of Western New York

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Creating a Culture of Shared Knowledge – Democratizing Your Organization’s Data via Dynamic Reporting

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This session will demonstrate how analysts went from the on-going cycle of recreating legacy reports and fielding help desk tickets for ad hoc data requests to utilizing open-source data science tools. This session features demos of web-based reports as case studies for how dynamic reporting tool can empower data users, strengthen your organization’s culture of openness, and ultimately serve to clearly and effectively visualize and quantify your organization’s impact. We will show how to build a custom interactive report on the spot.

Matt Stevens, Director of Data Science
Geoffrey Kip, Data Analyst

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Creating a data driven culture inside the CoCs through advanced data visualization

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This presentation discusses how the Washington Families Fund Systems Initiative team led by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Building Changes and King, Pierce and Snohomish Counties used Tableau software to create visualizations that went beyond illustrating quantitative findings but uncovered new knowledge about homeless individuals’ experience. This work culminates in great wins for organizations. Key visualizations created by the evaluators and analysts from King County can be viewed in a publicly available website http://allhomekc.org/the-problem/#the-numbers.
John Barr, Senior Consultant, Viztric
Stephanie Roe, Project Manager, King County, Performance Measurement & Evaluation Unit

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Data Migration (From Legacy to Real Time)

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

July 2016: the Georgia HMIS Steering Committee was told their HMIS software would not sustain the requirements needed for the state. We had only 3 months because the legacy HMIS software would not be available after the 1st of the year. Each component of the migration and transition was expedited with no room for error. A project management work plan included procurement, training, planning for non-HMIS data, data warehousing, and legacy data migration. This session discusses how GA HMIS procurement, migration and transition happened in 3 months and we lived to tell about it.

Dave Totten, Business Operations Coordinator, Georgia Department of Community Affairs
Jeanette Pollock, Special Projects Manager, Georgia Department of Community Affairs

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Increasing HMIS Participation

April 24, 2017 2017 Spring Conference

This interactive session provides a place for participants to discuss HMIS participation and learn best practices. Facilitated by the Cloudburst Group, the session focuses on increasing HMIS participation, particularly by providers not federally funded or without a requirement to participate in HMIS. There will be a focus on opportunities and barriers, including impact of federal data collection rules. The session explores merits of various data entry and participation methods (direct data entry, periodic uploads, etc.) used when bringing new programs or providers onto HMIS.

Abbilyn Miller, Ph.D., Data Analyst and SNAPs Specialist, HUD
Joel Remigio, Sr. Analyst, Housing and Community Development, The Cloudburst Group

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Youth Privacy Summit

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Integration and Warehousing Data Standards and Regulations

NHSDC and the National Network for Youth (NN4Y) are convening The Youth Privacy Summit, a gathering of service providers, educators, justice administrators, and federal/state/local policy makers to formally document barriers to collecting accurate and timely information from young people experiencing homelessness. As recent successes in ending veterans’ homelessness have shown, measuring the problem is a prerequisite to solving it.

The complex intersection of privacy protections, emergency needs, and community goals creates a challenging environment for service providers to collect eligibility information, service needs, and connect unaccompanied minors to life-saving services. Often outreach workers and social workers are confronted with a choice between serving a youth or documenting their interaction.

NHSDC has a history of creating forums for policy makers, service providers, and data experts to navigate complex challenges. Solving the critical problems that put young people on the street without access to resources requires contributions from a variety of experts. NHSDC is partnering with NN4Y to bring together the best group of people to define the problem.

NN4Y mobilizes the collective power and expertise of our national community to influence public policy and strengthen effective responses to youth homelessness. NN4Y has been a critical partner assisting communities resolve challenges consolidating HMIS and RHYMIS. This unique forum will gather an inventory of barriers to collecting information both for use in understanding youth homelessness, and more importantly, as an essential activity to connecting individual youth with service providers.

This discussion is a necessary step to overcome the barriers that contribute to youth homelessness in the United States. The goal of the Summit is to create a clear articulation of the problem to allow for continued progress measuring and ending youth homelessness. NHSDC and NN4Y are committed to this goal and believe this Summit will be the next step in that process.

Making Data Available on a Website Near You – Now showing – The HMIS Archive

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

HUD’s national HMIS Data Lab created a methodology to archive, attend, and display de-identified client-level HMIS data to allow users to query and use data in new ways. The presentation will explain how data is cleaned, stripped from all identifiers, attended in a SQL table, and made visible with an interactive (.net) web front. Participants will receive the documentation and code necessary to reproduce this with your own HMIS data. Presenter(s): David Durkalski and Meradith Alspaugh, The Partnership Center.

HOPWA & HMIS: Enhancing Coordination and Health Outcomes

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Reporting and Data Analysis

This session will be an opportunity for HOPWA providers serving homeless PLWHA and required to use Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) to discuss successes and challenges around how we, as a community, can collect accurate and complete data while respecting client confidentiality. Additional topics: implementing /reporting for HOPWA programs through HMIS and the connection between HMIS, IDIS, Care Act Programs and other federal programs. Presenter(s): Rusty Bennett and Becky Blalock, Collaborative Solutions, Inc.

Accelerating Outcome Improvement Through Care Coordination Technology

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Collaborations

Integrated care coordination technology equips CBOs, government, schools, and employers to work together, keeping clients from falling through the cracks. Unite US and 2-1-1 San Diego will report on new collaborative technology, and review the successes/failures of networks currently deploying these tools. Presenters will discuss evidence-based impact, lessons learned, and paths forward. Audience members will learn about this innovative collective-impact approach, including use of community-wide data to perfect service delivery. Presenter(s): Taylor Justice (@tayjustice), Unite US; Bill York (@billyorksd), 2-1-1 San Diego.

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Critical Conversation: The Intersection of DV and Homelessness in a Data Driven World

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Collection

Through a unique federal partnership between the DOJ, HUD and HHS, the national Domestic Violence & Housing Technical Assistance Consortium was created to improve policies, identify promising practices and strengthen collaborations to improve housing options for survivors of DV. This interactive session will examine the critical intersection of DV and homelessness and explore the challenges and emerging practices of integrating DV into coordinated entry and effective data collection. Presenter(s): Rusty Bennett and Christie Bevis, Collaborative Solutions, Inc.; Larisa Kofman, National Alliance for Safe Housing; Monica McLaughlin, National Network to End Domestic Violence; Anne Menard, National Resource Center for Domestic Violence.

You Can Do It! Developing a Statewide Annual Report on Homelessness

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

An HMIS system is a powerful tool, providing a wealth of data. However, that data is only valuable if it is used! In this session, we will cover the fundamentals of creating a CoC or statewide annual report. We will cover important decisions surrounding analytic measurement, approaches to validating data, and developing narrative to explain trends. Presenter(s): Gerry Leslie and Barb Ritter, The Michigan Coalition Against Homelessness.

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Moving the System with Data

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

Data is a key tool to effective decision making and future planning for Continua of Care as funding becomes more and more competitive. While the value of data is becoming more and more recognized for community planning and evaluation, often communities struggle with how to make data accessible and usable across multiple data sources, including HMIS, Point in Time Count data (both from HMIS and Counting Us, a Point in Time Count Mobile App developed by Simtech Solutions, Inc.), the Housing Inventory, the AHAR, System Performance Measures, and others. Since the early 2000’s, The Planning Council has served as the backbone support agency for two Continua of Care (CoC) in the southeastern Virginia region. In that time, their CoC team has worked collaboratively with community partners to develop a number of reports and evaluation tools based on the data sources mentioned above, in an effort to move beyond fulfilling federal and state funding requirements for many of the reports, to actually using the data to inform strategies and funding priorities to effectively end. Presenter(s): Yilla Smith and Becky O’Meara, The Planning Council.

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Using Web-based Solutions to End Veteran Homelessness in Los Angeles

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

No more spreadsheets! LA is using web-based solutions to build our by-name list and track housing veterans. The presentation is targeted for intermediate and advanced users and admins of by-name lists, HMIS and other data systems. Covering the development process and challenges of creating the list, including un-duplicating records, privacy concerns, and data integration of multiple sources, and allowing for community feedback and adapting policies and procedures to the web. Presenter(s): Pada Lee, Joanna Bomba and Andrew Angeles, Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority.

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The Larkin Street Outcomes Lifecycle: From Creation to Cultural Shift

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

In 2013 Larkin Street outlined an outcomes framework with short, intermediate, and long-term agency wide outcome goals in four life domains: housing, education, employment, and wellness. Since then, Larkin Street has utilized a data management system to record, measure, report on, and learn from outcome findings. This workshop will cover the outcomes lifecycle and will include a discussion on successes, limitations, developing staff buy-in, and using data to inform the work. Presenter(s): Meghan Bernstein and Erica Werpetinski, Larkin Street Youth Services.

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Utilizing Data to Drive Care Coordination of Frequent Users of Medical Transports and Emergency Departments

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

Mecklenburg EMS Agency (Medic) and Mecklenburg County Community Support Services shares its developed framework in identifying individuals with high frequency use of emergency transport, often times, for non-emergency medical treatment. Attendees will learn how to share and utilize data of frequent and super users of EMS, determine stakeholders to address needs of users, and understand the importance of continued engagement and assessment. Presenter(s): Allison In nger, Mecklenburg EMS Agency; Karen Pelletier (@KPMSW1), Mecklenburg County Community Support Services.

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Using Technology to Create an Effective By-Name List: A How To and Action Planning Workshop

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Integration and Warehousing

During this workshop, participants will learn concrete recommendations and best practices that can be used to create and leverage a real-time, up-to-date, community wide By-Name List of all people experiencing homelessness. Participants will evaluate their current technology and data systems against these recommendations to identify gaps and understand various options for solutions. Participants will strategize and action plan next steps necessary to execute any desired recommendation and best practices. Presenter(s): Karina Mueller and Jessica Marcus, Community Solutions; Tauri Royce, Bitfocus, Inc.

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Designing and Implementing a Data Quality Assurance Program for your CoC’s HMIS

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Integration and Warehousing

Communities often rely on a data quality policy or plan with only periodic monitoring to ensure data quality in their community. During this session, participants will learn how to develop a comprehensive data quality program and will be given the tools necessary to understand and utilize the four key components of a sound data quality program: CoC HMIS Data Quality Plan; enforceable agreements; monitoring and reporting; and compliance processes. Presenter(s): Natalie Matthews, Abt Associates; Mike Lindsay, ICF.

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Crossing Data to Connect Systems: Using Data to Improve Services for Vulnerable People

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

Learn about the Houston/Harris County Continuum of Care and two Managed Care Organizations’ (United Healthcare and Molina) experience of how the housing and health services systems engaged in data exchange to identify shared frequent users and best target resources. The session will explore each party’s unique interest in participation, initial challenges, lessons learned, successes and how this exchange began to build a bridge of communication for the two systems. Presenter(s): Kelly Opot (@ksotx), CSH (@cshinfo); Kim Nettleton, United Healthcare (@UnitedHealthGrp); Eva Thibaudeau (@texaseva13), Coalition for the Homeless; Susan Tucker, Molina Healthcare, Inc. (@molinahealth).

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Los Angeles County Family System Dashboard (Homeless Family Solutions System)

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

The Homeless Family Solutions System is the first homeless system in the country created specifically to serve homeless families. This presentation will show how the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority is using software to share, with the public, current data for their Homeless Family Solutions System and how it is using real time data to inform program implementation and process changes. Presenter(s): Martha Macias, LA Family Housing Corporation; Vanessa Romero and Andrew Angeles, Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority.

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Challenges and Solutions for Collecting Comprehensive Data on Homelessness in Rural Communities

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Collection

As HUD continues to emphasize the importance of HMIS data coverage and comprehensive PIT counts for Continua of Care (CoC) to inform strategic resource allocation and to generate System Performance Measures, it becomes critical for CoCs covering rural communities and large geographies to identify innovative strategies for increasing data coverage and comprehensiveness. The presentation will first identify and discuss the various challenges faced by CoCs covering rural areas in terms of collecting complete and accurate data on homelessness. Topics include expanding HMIS coverage, conducting accurate and comprehensive PIT counts, utilizing alternative data collection approaches, and developing community-wide Active or Master Lists. The audience will hear about the various strategies that have been successful to increase data quality and coverage and deliver services across a large geographic region. The session will also allow adequate time for participants to ask questions of the presenters and to share their own experiences regarding challenges and solutions to collecting and using data across rural and/or large geographic areas. The presentation is intended to help these CoC’s identify potential strategies that they can implement as well as to connect staff from various rural CoCs in order to facilitate peer to peer sharing after NHSDC ends. Presenter(s): Fran Ledger, Canavan Associates; Ryan Burger and Chris Pitcher (@pitcherific), ICF.

Lessons from Homelink: How to Design & Implement Technology for Coordination and Collaboration

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Collaborations

In this session, participants will learn from Community Solutions’ experience of developing and implementing Homelink, a cloud-based technology that supports Coordinated Entry Systems and one of the first databases to foster true collaboration through a centralized data system. Our presentation will include a history of Homelink’s development, initial obstacles to adoption and utilization, and lessons about the bidirectional relationship between developing coordinated systems and adopting technology designed for collaboration. Presenter(s): Karina Mueller and Jana Pohorelsky, Community Solutions.

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The Architecture and Capabilities of Monterey’s Open Source Coordinated Entry System

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Collaborations

Monterey/San Benito CoC needed a flexible Coordinated Entry System (CES) that could support new apps, communicate with other community systems, and be easily changed without a lot of dificulty. So, a group of non-profits, schools, and companies all got to work on building one. It had to meet the community’s needs, be open source, and be high quality. This is the story of their true life adventure. Presenter(s): Roxanne V. Wilson, The Monterey Coalition of Homeless Services Providers (@MontereyCES); Bob Russell and Javier Celedon, Community Technology Alliance; Eric Jahn, Alexandria Consulting; Norris Brown, ServingLynk Systems, LLC.

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Protecting Privacy in Social Services

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Privacy and Ethics

Protecting a homeless person’s right to privacy is of utmost importance. Homeless service providers must navigate overlapping privacy laws and regulations and also combat myths associated with them, all of this in an increasingly interconnected environment where the popularity of social media platforms call into question how much value people place in privacy. The session will examine the following aspects of privacy – how to create a privacy culture, developing a privacy plan, and data sharing and consent requirements under federal laws and guidelines (HIPAA, 42 CFR Part 2). Presenter(s): Joel Remigio and Dan Fox, The Cloudburst Group.

Past Due: PATH & HMIS Integration

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

HUD and SAMHSA have set a deadline for the end of Fiscal Year 2016 for all PATH providers to be participating in HMIS. Most states will have reached this deadline to complete the PATH integration into HMIS between July 1 and October 1, 2016. With the passing of the federal deadline, this roundtable session will provide the latest guidance from HUD and SAMHSA on integrating PATH data collection into HMIS. Presenter(s): Chris Pitcher (@pitcherific), Mike Lindsay and Ryan Burger, ICF.

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Not Just an Urban Issue: Rural System Building Utilizing Your HMIS Implementation

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

This session will examine the challenges encountered by a geographically large and mostly rural CoC, and how your HMIS implementation can assist you in holding the system together. WVCEH has encountered various successes (and a few failures) as they continue to build their system, and, hopefully, communities of any size can gain a better understanding of these challenges, and some ideas to generate strategies to meet the needs within their own communities. Presenter(s): Rachel Coen (@77rachel) and Matt Hedrick (@mattshedrick), West Virginia Coalition to End Homelessness (@wvceh).

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Community Decisions Using Data & Research 101 (“Non-Researchers” Welcome!)

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

Are you wishing you could use your data for deeper analysis? Do you want to better understand how to use research findings? In this introductory session, participants will learn the basics of how to read data charts and understand statistical significance. The session will cover practical information from understanding population size when interpreting HMIS outcomes and p values to data visualization tips for presenting data results. Presenter(s): Caitlin Frumerie and Jamie Taylor, The Cloudburst Group.

Translating Data for Community Planning

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Data Standards and Regulations

This session will inform participants on how to utilize data for strategic planning, focusing on HMIS Lead Agencies and CoCs having a common understanding of the data. Information will be conveyed through a presentation that will share best practices developed within two CoCs. This includes use of HMIS and other forms of homeless data translation techniques such as dashboards, scorecards and other graphics to make the data understandable for planning. Presenter(s): Colleen Velez and Margaret Palmer, Corporation for Supportive Housing; Dawn Gilman, Changing Homelessness; Kimberly Schmitt, All Chicago.

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HACing Los Angeles: Changing the Course of Homelessness by Bringing People Together around Data

October 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference Policy and Procedures

What will it take to end homelessness? In Los Angeles, getting the data necessary to help us answer that question often required a little political savvy and a lot of perseverance. Enter the Homelessness Analysis Collaborative, whose mission is to“HACk”homelessness itself. Hear how the group has overcome barriers and developed tools that have led to real change, and learn how to create “data loving” communities of your own. Presenter(s):MichaelNailat,UnitedWayofGreaterLosAngeles;MarkSliverbush,AbtAssociates.

Roundtable Discussion on HUD’s New Definition of Chronic Homelessness

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

On December 4th, 2015 HUD released its Final Rule on Defining “Chronically Homeless.” This rule provides new guidance on what signifies an occurrence of homelessness, and presents new challenges for CoCs that are seeking to understand the scale of chronic homelessness in their community. During this round table discussion, attendees will receive a brief overview of the new definition and of the resources out from HUD to support the implementation of this rule. The majority of this session will be an interactive discussion with audience members to understand what challenges and successes they have encountered so far in the implementation of the new rule, including lessons learned from the 2016 Point-in-Time Count.

Advancing a Technology Culture to End Homelessness in Los Angeles

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

In January 2016, both the City and the County of Los Angeles adopted comprehensive, coordinated strategic plans for addressing and ending homelessness in the region. City and County leaders will discuss the creation those plans and how technology and data with be leveraged their implementations.

Phil Ansell, Director of the LA County Homeless Initiative
Alisa Orduña, Director of Homelessness Policy, Office of LA Mayor Eric Garcetti

Strengths-based Housing Plans: An Evidenced Based HMIS Application to Meet HUD Data Standards

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

Community Rebuilders is a nonprofit housing agency providing strengths-based, housing first services in Kent County, Michigan. Our programs have been recognized by HUD and NAEH as national best practice models. In 2007 Community Rebuilders was the first provider in Kent County to create a rapid rehousing program, through this creation, the Housing First strengths-based model was developed. The HMIS strength-based housing plans are individualized housing plans focused on three main goals; obtaining and maintaining housing, increasing income and increasing self sufficiency. Plans are based on consumers needs, strengths, resources, wants and aspirations. This plan creates one electronic file that serves a consumer from initial program eligibility to graduated disengagement. The purpose of this session is to impress upon providers, funders, HMIS vendors and elected officials the value added in utilizing a strength-based case management model incorporated into your HMIS system.

Anna Diaz, Community Rebuilders
Jeffrey King, Community Rebuilders

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What A Long Strange Trip It’s Been: Data Management in Pima County, Arizona

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

The management of data in local communities has been under pressure due to HUD policy following the implementation of the HEARTH Act. Communities have struggled to implement a more inclusive and comprehensive set data management policies that accommodate the data sharing, the coordinated entry system and system performance measures. This session will detail the data management plan, policy, and implementation process in Pima County, Arizona over the last few years.

Chris Pitcher, ICF International
Pam Moseley, Pima County Community Services

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Demystifying Privacy Law: Practical Advice for HMIS and Human Services System Administrators

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference Privacy and Ethics

HIPAA, FERPA, VAWA, 42 CFR Part II–HMIS and Human Services data professionals must navigate an easily confusing alphabet soup of privacy regulations as they develop policies and procedures, facilitate collaboration and sharing, and expand the collection and use of client data in service delivery. HomeBase, a San Francisco based public policy law firm, will guide participants through the basic regulatory framework governing HMIS and related human services type client data including the basic elements of privacy regulations covering health care, substance abuse treatment, domestic violence, and school records. We’ll discuss common privacy pitfalls and misconceptions and provide practical advice, strategies and resources to overcome them.

Jeff Ugai, HomeBase
Eli Hamilton, HomeBase

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Not Just Another Waiting List: Effectively Using a Housing Prioritization List in a Coordinated Access System

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

This session examines the creation and implementation of the by-name, housing-focused prioritization list and reports created by the WV Coalition to End Homelessness, and how the reports act as the cornerstone of the CoC’s Coordinated Access efforts. The process developed prioritizes what housing intervention is best suited for a Client based off their acuity score as determined by the Vulnerability Index Service Prioritization Decision Assistance Tool (VI-SPDAT). Community stakeholders are able to determine which members of their unhoused population have the most immediate need for housing. The list is accessible at any time and is especially helpful for use in community based Housing prioritization meetings. Numerous modifications have been made to the list since it was first implemented, making it a more dynamic tool for housing prioritization. It is the hope of the proposed presenters of this session that attendees will gain knowledge of both WVCEH’s hits and misses as they have benefited through this process, and how the use of data has been integral.

Matthew Hedrick, WV Coalition to End Homelessness, Inc.
Rachael Coen, WV Coalition to End Homelessness, Inc.

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Developing a Mobile Application to Support your PIT Count and Streamline Data Collection

April 13, 2016 2016 Fall Conference

For the 2015 PIT count, the Fresno Madera Continuum of Care (FMCoC) deployed 178 volunteers to complete the largest number of surveys the continuum has collected, 789. Concerned about the labor intensive survey process, quality of data, time-consuming data entry, and time-lag between PIT count completion and data summary, the FMCoC voted to conduct the 2016 unsheltered tally and survey PIT count using mobile technology. When reviewing application proposals, emphasis was put on survey workflow, user friendliness, administrative capabilities in regard to customization, and off-line capabilities. The process of testing the application was essential in reassuring the community stakeholders and volunteers that this paperless process was simple, secure and advantageous, serving to broaden the information we glean from our local homeless population. With simplified data capture and export from our server a deeper analysis was able to be conducted using statistical software, GIS applications, and other tools. The creation of components, such as an administrative web front-end tool granting admin rights to any application variables, has opened the door for community discussion around mobile supported outreach.

Cassie Morgan, Fresno Housing Authority
Melissa Mikel, Fresno Housing Authority

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Utilizing GIS for Providing Homeless Services

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

Connecticut became the first state to end chronic veteran homelessness. CT’s successful campaign to functionally end veteran homelessness contained elements familiar to communities around the country – increased communication between providers, coordination of outreach efforts, better targeting and leveraging of existing housing resources. But it ultimately turned on developing a highly precise and quantitative definition of our goal, and, more importantly, creating an extremely advanced data system that tracks all veterans in light of our statewide criteria. Our data system accounts for each veteran in the system by name, and shares up-to-date information with state leaders and frontline staff. While based on existing capabilities in HMIS, CT’s system is significantly more powerful than existing software, and allows us to track and pursue our goals much more effectively. This statewide system is – to our knowledge – unique in the U.S., and represents, we believe, the only way to reach functional zero with full confidence and efficiency. This presentation will explain the role a comprehensive data system plays in reaching functional zero, and enumerates the steps communities must pursue to develop one.

Nathan Cheung, Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority

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