Archives: Sessions

The Final Countdown: PATH HMIS Integration

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) have set a deadline for the end of Fiscal Year 2016 for all PATH providers to be participating in HMIS. Most states will reach their deadline to complete the PATH integration into HMIS between July 1 and October 1, 2016. In light of the looming deadline, this session will provide the latest guidance from HUD and SAMHSA on integrating PATH data collection into HMIS. Presenters will focus on challenges and solutions related to the collection of street outreach data, as well as practical strategies for ensuring successful PATH data entry, data quality, and data use in HMIS.

Chris Pitcher, ICF International
Mike Lindsay, ICF International
Sylvia Nelson, Center For Social Innovation

Download File

Gathering HMIS Data Across NYS for Cross-Systems Analysis and Collaboration

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

New York state is made up of multiple implementations of HMIS which serve between 1 and 23 counties each, with NYC being the largest implementation. Because of these multiple implantations plus some communities that are still not covered with an HMIS at all, the NY State Office of Temporary Assistance (NYSOTDA) has been working with HMIS System Administrators to collect the HMIS data in a warehouse in order to ascertain the true face of homelessness and service utilization in the State for better delivery of services. This presentation, given by CARES, Inc. in collaboration with OTDA (who will not be present, but will assist in creating the presentation) will look at the process for creation of this data warehouse from inception to function.

Allyson Thiessen, CARES, Inc.

Download File

HMIS & Sharing Data: It Seems Complicated but Doesn’t Have to Be

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

This session will review successful strategies to overcome data sharing challenges. Many communities continue to struggle with developing and implementing the logistical processes to be compliant with HUD, VA and HHS programmatic requirements such as Coordinated Entry that necessitate data sharing across projects and federal programs. With one deadline from Opening Doors past and others looming, it becomes increasingly important for CoCs to bring all appropriate partners to the table in an effort to collect required data and modify systems to meet the goal of getting to “Zero”. This presentation will use a community example to of ‘what not to do’ as well as successful solutions to overcome challenges created when HIPAA and other confidentiality concerns are raised as reasons not to share data. It will also include discussion on the successes and challenges in defining the role the HMIS system will take in development of the data sharing systems. Concepts covered, in alignment with the HMIS proposed rule (maybe HMIS final rule), will revolve around processes that incorporate a strong ROI, policy development (security, reporting incidents, and disaster recovery), annual security audits, vendor inclusion and clearly defined roles and responsibilities of all participating partners.

Susan Starett, TAC
Joe Scalise, Info Line, Inc.

Download File

Website DIY: Quick, Simple and Free Strategies to Harness the Web to Showcase Human Services Data

April 13, 2016 2016 Spring Conference

Turning data-driven insights into policy action hinges on the ability to effectively communicate with key stakeholders. An engaging web presence is essential to communicating your message to a broad audience, however many organizations lack the funding or resources for a dedicated web development team. We will provide a quick, 101-style overview of modern web development from planning and design to development, marketing and launch with a focus on practical, accessible tools for those without a formal development background. We highlight a number of free and/or open source tools and resources and discuss how to use them to showcase your data on the web, build your site, track performance and user engagement, and tie the site into your broader marketing and communications strategy and address common pitfalls.

Jeff Ugai, HomeBase

Download File